Tagged: Industrial Revolution Toggle Comment Threads | Keyboard Shortcuts

  • hardie karges 5:24 am on July 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: agricultural revolution, , , , , Industrial Revolution, , , , , ,   

    Buddhism is not Superior to Christianity, but… 

    20180625_092428I only know that it is more appropriate for these self-engorged capitalistic end-times than the prevailing paradigm, which is probably the cause of this effect. The original teachings of JC and the Buddha are almost superfluous at this point, anyway, what with so much cultural baggage added on over all the years, much of it far from the original teachings…

    And in short, those original teachings consist briefly of Jesus’s ‘love thy neighbor as thyself’ and the Buddha’s ‘cure for suffering in the cessation of craving’, and from those two starting points evolves the history of much of the world, the traditional west largely ambitious, aggressive, individualistic, loud and consuming, while the traditional East is largely passive, shy, conforming, quiet and retiring. Note that those two traditional paradigms largely parallel the traditional paradigms of male vis a vis female… (More …)

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    • Esther S. Fabbricante 5:44 am on July 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Deep!

    • modernhadassah 5:59 am on July 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Interesting. “Womanly wiles” came about from having no other recourse. That’s the only way oppressed womanhood could effect change. I guess, when I follow the logic through of how religion effects change it’s on the manipulated and oppressed. What do you think? You have started a good conversation, I suspect.

      • hardie karges 6:53 am on July 22, 2018 Permalink | Reply

        Yes, I suspect that there’s an inversely proportional relationship between worldly success and religio-philosophical adherence…

    • Alex 2:27 pm on September 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      “frankly I wash dishes to clean them, for purposes of health, and sanitation, and aesthetic compatibility”

      Sounds to me like you are washing the dishes mindfully… That’s a good meditation!

  • hardie karges 3:45 pm on June 3, 2018 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , Industrial Revolution, John Stuart Mill,   

    Beware of Buddhist side-effects: Peace, Love, and Understanding… 

    IMG_2290Like a new drug, when trying out a new religion, philosophy or belief system, it’s probably wise to ask about any potential side-effects. Of course sometimes those ‘side-effects’ turn out to be something not anticipated, or imagined, and maybe even far better than what was intended. The history of pharmacopeia is full of such examples, when the ‘side-effects’ of a drug led to new usages that yielded great benefits to the healing processes—and perversions—of human beings..

    This also happens in the case of new ideas. Who knew that John Stuart Mills’ evocation of the ‘invisible hand’ of the marketplace would yield not only an Industrial Revolution of textiles and iron, but a digital revolution of gigabytes and live streaming, the former populated by skyscrapers and fashion, the latter by instant worldwide communication and virtual realities intrinsically internal… (More …)

     
    • quantumpreceptor 3:22 am on June 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Well said my friend, well said. It is really easy to see and to judge whether something is beneficial or not. Plant the seed and watch it grow. If you grow weeds, start again. If you grow flowers and fruit you have really done something.

      QP

    • hardie karges 3:52 am on June 4, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      Exactly, my friend, exactly. Thanks for your kind words…

    • Dave Kingsbury 3:37 pm on June 12, 2018 Permalink | Reply

      You make a very good case here. And provide a useful, well-balanced summary of the differences:

      “Bottom line: the current outcome of Christianity is chaos, consumption and aggression, even if its best days were all about love, growth, and creativity. On the other hand Buddhism is all about silence, adaptation and harmony, even if the bad old days included much too much renunciation, stasis and denial… ”

      All about outcomes indeed!

  • hardie karges 6:11 am on June 8, 2017 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , , , hippie, Industrial Revolution, liberalism, , , sustainability, ,   

    #Political #Liberalism is Dying—and Uncool is the New Cool… 

    img_1069When the world is in chaos, normalcy is hip. For many decades now, we’ve worshipped the ‘adventurer’ out on the edge, bold and daring, whether in sports or art or literature or music: the wild man, the risk-taker, the bad boy, and all too often: the degenerate, drinker, drug abuser, and sexual deviant…

    That was all well and good in the British uptight Victorian era and its American 20th century post-war equivalent, during which we were sitting on top of the world—and our asses, all the while having fun fun fun while bombing the Hell out of Vietnam, the lady of the house staying home all day, taking care of the kids, with a little help from a hired colored hand, from the other side of town, from the other side of life, from the other side of the world, long time coming long time gone… (More …)

     
  • hardie karges 7:47 am on March 23, 2008 Permalink | Reply
    Tags: , Celts, Industrial Revolution   

    Industrial RPM’s 

    The Brits didn’t know what they were starting with that little Industrial Revolution thing.  The rest of Europe was slow to warm up to it, I guess because it wasn’t pretty.  Most European countries have a better esthetic sense than Britain.  Science, philosophy, literature, etc. finds Britain at or near the top.  The less abstract arts like painting (and cuisine) they score lower in.  The Industrial Revolution was the death of craftsmanship, not to mention the environment.  They then had to re-invent craftsmanship and redefine it as an art.  What will happen with the environment is an ongoing question.  The ‘dark Satanic mills’ of England were hardly an inspiration.  The rest of Europe must have scoffed until they realized they were missing the boat economically; then they scurried to catch up. Why Britain got such a head start is a matter of conjecture, but I suspect the fact that they had such a capable and well-defined working class was a major factor.  I suspect that, with their long-innovative Celtic roots, the working class in fact created the revolution, which the Germanic upper class capitalized, directed, and ultimately, capitalized on.  Until electricity came along, it was all about gears and wheels and mechanics.  The ancient Celts had a pivoting front axle long before the road-building Romans, allowing for efficient four-wheeled vehicles that could actually turn without being dragged through a corner.  The word ‘car’, in fact, is of Celtic origin and, along with the word ‘cerveza’, sounds a whole lot like the ‘hood’ to me.  What the Celts never had much of were cities.  That’s a major disadvantage in the history of civilization, i.e. ‘city-fication’.  As the age of cities arose, the Celts moved farther and farther away until now they cling to the ocean cliffs of Ireland with nowhere left to go as an independent culture.  The rest is history. 

     
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